Recipe: Chicken Noodle Soup For Flu Emergencies

On Monday, I awoke with a crushing case of the flu. Head stuffed with cement and couldn’t get out of bed kind of flu, the real deal. But in a moment of over-the-counter-drug induced faux clarity, I hobbled to the kitchen and assembled some chicken noodle soup with what I had on hand and had hot, piping soup within an hour.

The key is to put the garlic in toward the end of cooking. That way, you’re destroying less of the array of medicinal qualities attributed to it, including killing bacteria. I also used a big handful of herbs from my containers on the patio for flavor. If you don’t have them, substitute with dried mixed herbs. I also only had mixed frozen vegetables on hand, but you can use fresh if you’ve got them. And use whatever chicken you’ve got on hand. I had a breast with rib on from breaking down chickens, even though I’ve called for the more populist boneless, skinless variety below.

Chicken soup for emergencies

2 tablespoons olive oil
½ yellow onion, chopped (about 1 ½ cups)
3 stalks celery, chopped (about 3/4 cup)
½ cup (125 ml) white wine or vermouth
2 quarts chicken stock (may use half water)
Large bouquet garni (a fistful mix of parsley, fresh oregano, thyme)
OR 1 tablespoon dried mixed herbs
½ teaspoon salt, a few cranks of pepper
1 large boneless, skinless chicken breast
1 16 oz. package frozen mixed vegetables
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 ounces (50 g) wide noodles
2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley (optional)


In a large Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion, and celery and cook until soft. Add the white wine and let reduce by one-half. Add the stock and/or water. Heat through. Add the chicken and herbs. Bring to a low boil, then reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, for 40 minutes. (This will effectively poach the chicken.)

Remove the chicken from the soup with tongs. Add the frozen vegetables and simmer in the liquid for a few moments while the chicken cools. After about five minutes, add in the noodles. Break the meat into bite-sized chunks and add to the pot after about a few minutes, once the noodles are halfway cooked, along with the chopped garlic. Simmer for another few minutes or until ready to eat, adding salt and and pepper as needed. Before serving, stir in the parsley. Makes about eight servings, or enough for a couple days with the flu. (Below, the big ass bouquet garni)

About katflinn

Kathleen Flinn is the author of "The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry," "The Kitchen Counter Cooking School" and "Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good." All are published by Viking/Penguin.

Comments

  1. Nice post and this post helped me alot in my college assignement. Say thank you you as your information.

Leave a Reply